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State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

Date: August 11, 2020
Number: NR20-192
Contact: CDPHpress@cdph.ca.gov

SACRAMENTO – In the past few days, working in partnership with the California Department of Technology (CDT), the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) cleared the data backlog reported last week and has continued processing new case records. Since Friday, we have processed the roughly 300,000 backlogged CalREDIE records, including both negative and positive test results.

The issue with the state's electronic laboratory reporting system that generated the backlog has been addressed and CDPH continues to closely monitor the performance of the system.

CDPH, along with the local public health departments, is processing the backlogged records and attributing cases to the correct reporting dates. As a result, the case counts reported today, and in the next few days, will include cases that would have been reported in earlier day and weeks – and are not an accurate representation of cases reported in the prior 24 hours.

Here are today's most recent statistics on COVID-19:

  • California has 574,411 confirmed cases to date. Numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed.
  • There have been 9,186,279 tests conducted in California. This represents an increase of 187,926 over the prior 24-hour reporting period.
  • As case numbers continue to rise in California, the total number of individuals who will have serious outcomes will also increase. There have been 10,468 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic.
  • A total of 38 counties are required to close indoor operations for certain sectors based on the July 13 order to slow community transmissionJuly 27 CA COVID-19 NumbersAugust3_CA_COVID-19_ByTheNumbers

California COVID-19 By the Numbers

*Note: Today's case counts include backlogged data – and are not an accurate representation of cases reported in the prior 24 hours.


Data and Tools

A wide range of data and analysis guides California’s response to COVID-19. The state is making the data and its analytical tools available to researchers, scientists and the public at covid19.ca.gov.

Popular links include:


Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C)

Each week, the California Department of Public Health updates the number of cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) reported in the state. As of August 11, 36 cases of MIS-C have been reported statewide. To protect patient confidentiality in counties with fewer than 11 cases, we are not providing total counts at this time.

MIS-C is a rare inflammatory condition associated with COVID-19 that can damage multiple organ systems. MIS-C can require hospitalization and be life threatening. Parents should be aware of the signs and symptoms of MIS-C including fever that does not go away, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, neck pain, rash, bloodshot eyes or feeling tired. Contact your child's doctor immediately if your child has these symptoms. Early diagnosis and treatment of patients is critical to preventing long-term complications.


Racial Demographics – A More Complete Picture

The California Department of Public Health is committed to health equity and collecting more detailed racial and ethnic data that will provide additional understanding for determining future action. Health outcomes are affected by forces including structural racism, poverty and the disproportionate prevalence of underlying conditions such as asthma and heart disease among Latinos and African American Californians. Only by looking at the full picture can we understand how to ensure the best outcomes for all Californians.

The differences in health outcomes related to COVID-19 are most stark in COVID-19 deaths. We have nearly complete data on race and ethnicity for COVID-19 deaths, and we are seeing the following trends: Latinos, African Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are dying at disproportionately higher levels. More males are dying from COVID-19 than females, in line with national trends. More information is available at COVID-19 Race and Ethnicity Data.


Health Care Worker Infection Rates

As of August 10, local health departments have reported 26,676 confirmed positive cases in health care workers and 137 deaths statewide.

 

County Monitoring Data

California is using data and science to respond to COVID-19. Data by county gives Californians insight into how their county is doing and provides an early indication of developing areas of concern. Counties on the County Monitoring List for three or more consecutive days – currently 38 counties accounting for the majority of the state’s population – must close indoor operations for additional activities.

August 11 County Monitoring List

For more information, visit the County Data Monitoring webpage.


Your Actions Save Lives

Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense:  

  • Staying home except for essential needs/activities following local and state public health guidelines when patronizing approved businesses. To the extent that such sectors are re-opened, Californians may leave their homes to work at, patronize, or otherwise engage with those businesses, establishments or activities.
  • Practicing social distancing.
  • Wearing a cloth face mask when out in public.
  • Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.
  • Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Covering a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.
  • Answer the call if a contact tracer from the CA COVID Team or your local health department tries to connect. Contact tracers will connect you to free, confidential testing and other resources, if needed.
  • Following guidance from public health officials.


What to Do if You Think You're Sick

Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (for example: fever, cough or shortness of breath), call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken. More than 100 community testing sites also offer free, confidential testing: Find a COVID-19 Testing Site.

For more information about what Californians can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19, visit Coronavirus (COVID-19) in California.

California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available on the California Department of Public Health's Guidance web page.

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