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Occupational Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2018

Social Media Messages

  1. Lead Poisoning Prevention Week is Oct. 21-27. Learn more about #lead in the workplace http://bit.ly/HazardAlertSMT, and find resources for workers, employers, and health care providers http://bit.ly/OccupationalLeadResourcesSMT #LeadPoisoning
    Worker wearing protective suit, respirator, and hardhat puts up a lead hazard sign over a doorway.

  2. Do you work with #lead? If you work in construction, demolition, painting, certain manufacturing jobs or shooting ranges, you may be exposed. You may have #LeadPoisoning even if you have no symptoms. Talk to your doctor. Get tested. http://bit.ly/HazardAlertSMT
    A worker wearing a white protective suit kneels while sanding paint off the exterior wall of an older building.

  3. Don't bring #lead home from your jobsite to your family. Learn how to protect your loved ones from "take home" lead #LeadPoisoning http://bit.ly/DontTakeLeadHomeSMT
    A worker wearing a protective suit and full face mask torches metal in a scrap metal yard.

  4. Does your business use or disturb #lead? As an employer, it’s your responsibility to protect your workers from exposure. Learn how to have an effective lead safety program http://bit.ly/LeadSafetyEmployersSMT #LeadPoisoning
    Shot-up target sheets hang from a shooting range with piles of bullets heaped behind the hanging sheets.

  5. Health care providers – when should you test for #lead? Learn which jobs & hobbies cause lead exposure and guidelines for medical management http://bit.ly/MedGuidelinesSMT #LeadPoisoning
    A health care provider draws blood from a man's arm in a clinic.

  6. Are you a painter? Do you work on older houses? Learn how to protect yourself from #lead. Get tested. Watch this video Lead's Revenge (¡La Venganza del Plomo!) to learn more about #LeadPoisoning http://bit.ly/LeadsRevengeSMT
    A worker wearing a protective suit and a respirator uses a sander to remove paint from the exterior of a Victorian building.


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