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H1N1 Vaccine Banner

This Web page is no longer being maintained or updated; it is provided for historical purposes only. For current information on seasonal influenza (flu), see the California Department of Public Health Influenza Web page.

 H1N1 Flu Information

General Information

H1N1 Flu Vaccine Supply - Questions and Answers

  • 01 - What is the California Department of Public Health's role in producing and distributing the H1N1 vaccine?
  • 02 - Why hasn’t CDPH ordered the full amount of doses allocated by CDC for the state?
  • 03 - Why hasn’t the vaccine been allocated proportionally by county population?
  • 04 - If the goal is to equalize the distribution going forward, how will that be achieved?   How long will it take?
  • 05 - In each county, some vaccinators are receiving the vaccine and some are not.  Is CDPH sending vaccine to the local health departments and they, in turn, distribute it within the community or is CDPH sending vaccine directly to private providers, school districts and others?
  • 06 - If CDPH is sending directly to private providers how do you determine which ones receive the vaccine first?
  • 07 - From whom do you order it?
  • 08 - Can you order more than has been allocated by the CDC?
  • 09 - When does CDPH estimate that there will be enough vaccine to meet demand?
  • 01 - What is the California Department of Public Health's role in producing and distributing the H1N1 vaccine?

    The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) is a kind of clearinghouse for vaccinators in California. Vaccinators register and place orders with the state. Once vaccine has been released for use in California, CDPH places orders, that have been reviewed by local health jurisdictions, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    02 - Why hasn’t CDPH ordered the full amount of doses allocated by CDC for the state? 

    It takes 24-48 hours to process orders before they can be submitted into CDC’s system which will always cause a difference between the number of doses allocated and the number of doses ordered. 

    03 - Why hasn’t the vaccine been allocated proportionally by county population? 

    Allocations are population based. Distribution problems, however, have caused temporary imbalances that will be resolved as more vaccine becomes available. 

    04 - If the goal is to equalize the distribution going forward, how will that be achieved?   How long will it take? 

    Jurisdictions with lower percentages are placed higher in the queue for available vaccine and then the percentages are reassessed on a weekly basis. When equalization will occur is dependent upon the vaccine supply. 

    05 - In each county, some vaccinators are receiving the vaccine and some are not.  Is CDPH sending vaccine to the local health departments and they, in turn, distribute it within the community or is CDPH sending vaccine directly to private providers, school districts and others? 

    Both mechanisms have been made available to the counties and both mechanisms are happening at the counties discretion. 

    06 - If CDPH is sending directly to private providers how do you determine which ones receive the vaccine first? 

    Local health jurisdictions have prioritized a list of providers in their jurisdictions and reviewed and modified provider orders to accommodate their allocation of vaccine. 

    07 - From whom do you order it? 

    We place orders with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which works with five manufacturers. 

    08 - Can you order more than has been allocated by the CDC? 

    No. 

    09 - When does CDPH estimate that there will be enough vaccine to meet demand? 

    We cannot estimate when sufficient supplies will arrive in California, but we are confident there will be enough eventually for everyone who wants a vaccination.


     
     
    Last modified on: 8/25/2011 12:51 PM