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CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES ADMINISTRATIVE PENALTIES TO NINE HOSPITALS 

Date: 10/25/2007 

Number: PH07-53 

Contact: Suanne Buggy or Lea Brooks  (916) 440-7259 

SACRAMENTO 

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced today that nine California hospitals have been assessed administrative penalties from the state of California after a determination that the facilities’ noncompliance with requirements of licensure has caused, or was likely to cause, serious injury or death to patients.
                                                           
The administrative penalties are the first to be issued by CDPH under new authority granted by Health and Safety Code section 1280.1 (Senate Bill 1312, Statutes of 2006, Chapter 895), which was signed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger last year and took effect Jan. 1, 2007.  The law allows CDPH to impose administrative penalties with a maximum fine of $25,000 per violation that constitutes immediate jeopardy to a patient’s health and safety.

“Working in partnership with hospitals throughout California, we are committed to ensuring all Californians receive quality patient care,” said Kathleen Billingsley, Deputy Director of the Center for Healthcare Quality at the California Department of Public Health.  “These penalties are an important enforcement tool for ensuring that quality care is provided to all patients in California.”

The following hospitals received penalties:

Enloe Medical Center (Chico, Butte County)

The hospital failed to develop and implement policies and procedures for the safe and effective administration of medications known to cause cardiac arrhythmias.

Feather River Hospital (Paradise, Butte County)

The hospital failed to develop and implement policies and procedures to ensure safe food handling practices as evidenced by the pooling of non-pasteurized shell eggs for extended periods of time, which may result in the potential of exposing patients to the risk of food borne illness such as salmonella; and the lack of cool down monitoring for potentially hazardous foods.

Feather River Hospital (Paradise, Butte County)

The hospital failed to provide pharmaceutical services that would meet the needs of the all patients by failing to develop and implement policies and procedures related to the use of pre-printed medication order forms that would ensure for safe and effective use of medications.

Garden Grove Hospital &  Medical Center (Garden Grove, Orange County)

The hospital failed to develop and implement written policies and procedures to ensure the safe and effective use of medications with black box warnings were developed and implemented. A black box warning shows that medical studies indicate that the drug carries a significant risk of serious or even life threatening adverse effects. Facility staff were unaware of the manufacturer’s warning and confirmed that patients were not monitored.

Glendale Memorial Hospital and Health Center (Glendale, Los Angeles County)

The hospital failed to ensure that medications dispensed for patient care were administered as ordered and in accordance with facility approved protocols.  In addition, the hospital failed to clarify an incomplete medication order and failed to follow facility approved policies and procedures for the safe administration of a medication. 

Hanford Community Hospital (Hanford, Kings County)

The hospital failed to have written policies and procedures for the establishment of a safe and effective system for the distribution, dispensing, and use for patient care of biologicals (products produced by living processes, i.e., insulin, vaccines, etc.).  The hospital failed to ensure that staff could accurately and quickly calculate a dose for emergency medications for pediatric use.

Kaiser Foundation Hospital Santa Clara (Santa Clara, Santa Clara County)

The hospital failed to provide patient safety by ensuring that written policies and procedures for the distribution of all drugs were developed and implemented to ensure the safe use of medications. 

Martin Luther King-Harbor Hospital (Los Angeles. Los Angeles County)

The hospital failed to ensure specialty consultation by a physician, ongoing medical evaluation, medically stabilizing treatment and physician intervention to ensure prompt transfer to a higher level of care for a patient who presented to the emergency department.

Martin Luther King-Harbor Hospital (Los Angeles, Los Angeles County)

The hospital failed to ensure prompt nursing assessments and medical care for a patient who presented to the emergency room.  The hospital failed to ensure the availability of competent and appropriate nurse staffing resources so that patients could receive prompt treatment.

Saint Agnes Medical Center (Fresno, Fresno County)

The hospital failed to have the proper policies and procedures for the administration of medications, and failed to ensure that registered nurses were appropriately trained.  The nurses’ knowledge was inconsistent regarding the administration of intravenous medication boluses.  There was a lack of uniformity in the responses regarding the administration of potentially dangerous intravenous medication boluses in the Intensive Care Unit setting.

Universal Health Services of Rancho Springs (Southwest Healthcare Systems) (Murietta, Riverside County)

The facility failed to provide adequate on-call physician coverage to meet the needs of patients receiving emergency care in the Emergency Department.  The facility failed to maintain an effective call system to provide care to patients in the Intensive Care Unit.

Facilities can appeal the administrative penalties by requesting a hearing within 10 calendar days of notification.  If a hearing is requested, the penalties are to be paid if upheld following appeal.   In addition to the penalties, the facility is required to implement a plan of correction to prevent future incidents. 

All hospitals in California are required to be in compliance with applicable state and federal laws and regulations governing general acute care hospitals.  The hospitals are required to comply with these standards to ensure quality of care.

The California Department of Public Health’s Licensing and Certification Division has the statutory authority to assess penalties against hospitals it licenses as part of enforcement remedies for violations of licensing requirements that cause immediate jeopardy to patients.

 
 
Last modified on: 6/2/2009 11:37 AM