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LATEST CALIFORNIA REPORT CARD SHOWS STATE ACHIEVING KEY HEALTH GOALS 

Date: 4/29/2010 

Number: 10-029 

Contact: Al Lundeen - (916) 440-7259 

SACRAMENTO 

                                                                                 ***Corrected Version***

California is meeting many key health objectives and saw lower rates of stroke, AIDS, influenza/pneumonia, coronary heart disease and tuberculosis last year according to an annual state/county public health report card released today.

“The good news is that we are meeting many key national objectives for good health,” said Dr. Mark Horton, director of the California Department of Public Health, which issued the report. “We remain committed to doing all we can to improve public health across all measures.”

The 2010 edition of an annual public health report -- “County Health Status Profiles 2010” -- shows that California met federal objectives for reducing the death rates for a number of categories, including death caused by all cancers, lung cancer, female breast cancer, prostate cancer, coronary heart disease and stroke. California also met the national objectives related to breastfeeding initiation and infant mortality.

The majority of remaining health indicators show there has been improvement since the prior reporting period. The objectives are part of the Healthy People 2010 goals – national goals that are established every decade and produced by the U.S. Department of Health Services’ Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

“The County Health Status Profiles report provides an excellent tool that tracks both our successes and challenges to improving the health of Californians,” said Dr. Mark Horton, director of the California Department of Public Health (CDPH).

The report shows that California has seen improvements in 21 of the 26 health status indicators examined, with fewer deaths from stroke, influenza/pneumonia, coronary heart disease, motor vehicle crashes, gunfire, prostate cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and homicide. There have also been fewer reported new AIDS and tuberculosis diagnoses. The six indicators with increases were Alzheimer’s disease, chlamydia, drug-induced deaths, low birth weight infants and suicide.

The “County Health Status Profiles 2010” is produced by CDPH and the California Conference of Local Health Officers. It measures health indicators as well as state and local health department progress toward achieving national goals for 2010.

Using three-year averages, the report compares death rates and/or reported incidence of certain health status indicators in 2003-2005 with those in 2006-2008. It shows the most dramatic decreases in the age adjusted death rates and/or crude case rates per 100,000 population in the following 11 areas:

• Stroke: The 2006 through 2008 age-adjusted death rate was 40.8 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 21.1 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 51.7.

• Reported Incidence of AIDS: case rate for age 13 and over was 11.6 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 17.7 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 14.1

• Influenza/Pneumonia: The 2006 through 2008 age-adjusted death rate was 19.6 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 17.6 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 23.8.

• Coronary Heart Disease: The 2006 through 2008 age-adjusted death rate was 137.1 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 15.9 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 163.1.

• Reported Incidence of Tuberculosis: The 2006 through 2008 case rate for tuberculosis was 7.2 cases per 100,000 population, a decrease of 13.3 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 8.3.

• Motor Vehicle Traffic Crashes: The 2006 through 2008 age-adjusted death rate was 10.3 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 12.7 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 11.8.

• Firearm-Related: The 2006 through 2008 age-adjusted death rate was 8.5 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 9.6 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 9.4.

• Prostate Cancer: The 2006 through 2008 age-adjusted death rate was 21.8 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 8.4 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 23.8.

• Lung Cancer: The 2006 through 2008 age-adjusted death rate was 38.1 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 8.2 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 41.5.

• Colorectal Cancer: The 2006 through 2008 age-adjusted death rate was 14.7 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 8.1 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 16.0.

• Homicide: The 2006 through 2008 age-adjusted death rate was 6.3 per 100,000 population, a decrease of 7.4 percent from the 2003 through 2005 rate of 6.8.

The federal “Healthy People 2010” challenges individuals, communities and professionals to take specific steps to ensure that good health and long life are enjoyed by all. To learn more about the national objectives visit http://www.healthypeople.gov/

 
 
Last modified on: 4/30/2010 2:54 PM