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2001 CalCHEEPS Data Tables

The 2001 California Children’s Healthy Eating and Exercise Practices Survey (CalCHEEPS) data tables provide detailed information about children’s dietary intake and practices, physical and sedentary activity, knowledge and awareness of the California Children’s 5 a Day—Power Play! Campaign, and factors that influence these behaviors including out-of-home eating, school and home environments, attitudes and beliefs, poverty, and weight status.  For more information regarding the CalCHEEPS data tables, contact Angie Jo Keihner, MS, at Angie.Keihner@cdph.ca.gov.

Changes in question wording between survey years (e.g., from 1999 to 2001) are indicated with red font at the top of each data table.  Red font and strikethrough are used to show deleted words.  Red font alone designates added words.

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    Table of Contents

  • Fruit and Vegetable Consumption
  • Whole Grain and Higher Fiber Foods
  • Milk Products
  • Protein Rich Foods
  • High Calorie, Low Nutrient Foods
  • Meals and Out-of-Home Eating
  • Physical Activity and Inactivity
  • Weight Status
  • Attitudes and Beliefs
  • Power Play! Campaign
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    Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

    A complete set of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption data tables (PDF)Opens in a new browser window

  • Table 1: Healthy Eating Practices Score Among California Children
  • Table 2: Total Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Consumed by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 3: Breakdown of the Fruits and Vegetables Reported by California Children 
  • Table 4: Servings of Fruits, Juices, Vegetables and Salads Consumed by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 5: Range in Number of Servings of Salads Eaten per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 6: Range in Number of Servings of Fried Potatoes Eaten per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 7: Range in Number of Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Consumed by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 8: Percent of Children Meeting Fruit and Vegetable Recommendations 
  • Table 9: Top Ten Most Commonly Consumed Fruits and Vegetables 
  • Table 10: Belief About the Number of Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Needed for Good Health 
  • Table 11: Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Believed to Be Needed Compared with Actual Fruit and Vegetable Consumption 
  • Table 12: Belief about Personal Success Eating Enough  Fruits and Vegetables
  • Table 13: Belief about Personal Success Eating Enough Fruits and Vegetables Compared with Actual Fruit and Vegetable Consumption
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    Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods

    A complete set of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods data tables (PDF) Opens in new browser window.

  • Table 14: Breakdown of the High Fiber and Whole Grain Foods Reported by California Children
  • Table 15: Range in the Number of Servings of Dry Beans Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
  • Table 16: Consumption of Cereal and High Fiber Cereal by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 17: High Fiber Food Consumption by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
  • Table 78: Range in the Number of Servings of High Fiber Whole Grain Bread Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
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    Milk Products

    A complete set of Milk Products data tables (PDF) Opens in new browser window.

  • Table 18: Breakdown of the Milk Products Reported by California Children
  • Table 19: Total Servings of Milk Products Consumed by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
  • Table 20: Range in Number of Servings of Dairy Desserts Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 21: Range in Number of Servings of Milk Products Consumed by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 22: Range in Number of Servings of Milk Drunk by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 23: Type of Milk Consumed by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions 
  • Table 24: Belief About the Number of Servings of Milk Needed for Good Health 
  • Table 25: Glasses of Milk Believed to Be Needed Compared with Actual Milk Consumption
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    Protein Rich Foods

    A complete set of Protein Rich Foods data tables (PDF)

  • Table 26: Breakdown of the Protein Rich Foods Reported by California Children  
  • Table 27: Total Servings of Protein Rich Foods Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions  
  • Table 28: Range in Number of Servings of Protein Rich Foods Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions  
  • Table 29: Range in Number of Servings of Beef, Pork and Other Red Meats Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions  
  • Table 30: Range in Number of Servings of Poultry and Fish Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions  
  • Table 31: Range in Number of Servings of Processed Meats Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
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    High Calorie, Low Nutrient Foods

    A complete set of High Calorie, Low Nutrient Foods data tables (PDF)Opens in a new browser window

  • Table 32: Total Servings of High Calorie, Low Nutrient Foods Consumed by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
  • Table 33: Breakdown of the Soda and Sweetened Beverages Reported by California Children
  • Table 34: Range in Number of Servings of Soda/Sweetened Beverages Drunk by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
  • Table 35: Breakdown of the Sweets Reported by California Children
  • Table 36: Range in the Number of Servings of Sweets Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
  • Table 37: Breakdown of the High Fat Snacks Reported by California Children
  • Table 38: Range in Number of Servings of High-Fat Snacks Eaten by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
  • Table 39: Range in Number of Servings of High Calorie, Low Nutrient Foods Eaten/Drunk by California Children per Typical Weekday for All Eating Occasions
  • Table 40: Drinking Soda and Sweetened Beverages Associated with Milk Consumption among California Children
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    Meals and Out-of-Home Eating

    A complete set of Meals and Out-of-Home Eating data tables (PDF) Opens in new browser window.

  • Table 43: Frequency of Eating School Lunch Served by the Cafeteria During a Typical Week 
  • Table 44: Percentage of Children Who Reported that Their Schools Served Breakfast, Hot Lunch, and Snacks 
  • Table 45: Children Reported Schools with Vending Machines and Fast Food Service 
  • Table 46: Frequency of Eating in a Fast Food Restaurant During the Past Week 
  • Table 47: Effect of School Breakfast, School Lunch, and Fast Food on Average Servings of Food Types on a Typical Weekday 
  • Table 48: Effect of School Breakfast, School Lunch, and Fast Food on Eating Recommended Foods on a Typical Weekday
  • Table 49: Favorite Type of Restaurant 
  • Table 51: Where Children Usually Spend Their Time After School
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    Physical Activity and Inactivity

    A complete set of Physical Activity and Inactivity data tables (PDF)Opens in a new browser window

  • Table 52: Range of Minutes Exercised by Children on a Typical Weekday
  • Table 53: Minutes of Light, Medium, Hard and Total Physical Activity on a Typical Weekday
  • Table 54: Percentage of Children Who Met Physical Activity Recommendation on a Typical Weekday
  • Table 55: Mode of Transportation to and from School on a Typical School Day
  • Table 56: Percentage of Children Who Reported Walking to School on a Typical Weekday
  • Table 57: Percentage of Children Who Reported Walking Home from School on a Typical Weekday
  • Table 58: Percentage of Children Using a Physically Active Method of Transportation to and from School on a Typical Weekday
  • Table 59: Comparison of the Frequency and Amount of Time Spent in School Physical Education Classes Between Children Reporting Any PE and All Children
  • Table 60: Frequency and Amount of Time Spent in School Physical Education Classes by California Children
  • Table 61: Minutes Spent on Sedentary Activities on a Typical Weekday: Television, Video Games and Computer for Fun
  • Table 62: Amount of Physical Activity Children Believed They Needed for Good Health
  • Table 63: Percentage of Children Who Played Sports Outside of Physical Education Classes
  • Table 64: Top Ten Most Common Forms of Exercise or Physical Activity per Typical Weekday for All Occasions
  • Table 65: Frequency of School Physical Education Classes by Average Minutes of Physical Activity
  • Table 75: Range in Days per Week that Children Met the Physical Activity Guideline
  • Table 76: Days of Physical Activity Believed to Be Needed Compared with Actual Activity Level
  • Table 77: Percentage of Children Who Participated in Adult-Supervised, Informal Physical Activities After School
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    Weight Status

  • Table 66: Distribution of Overweight Status of California Children Based on Body Mass Index (PDF)Opens in a new browser window
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    Attitudes and Beliefs

    A complete set of Attitudes and Beliefs data tables (PDF) Opens in new browser window.  

  • Table 67: Percentage of Children Receiving Lessons from a Teacher, Coach, or Other Instructor at School
  • Table 68: Parental Factors for Healthy Eating 
  • Table 69: Personal, Social, and Environmental Factors for Healthy Eating  
  • Table 70: Parental Factors for Physical Activity 
  • Table 71: Personal, Social, and Environmental Factors for Physical Activity 
  • Table 72a/b: Food Consumption Factors Among California Children Associated with Behavioral Theories 
  • Table 73a/b: Physical Activity Factors Among California Children Associated with Behavioral Theories 
  • Table 74: School Environment Factors Among California Children Associated with Behavioral Theories
  • Table 80: Participation in Growing Fruits and Vegetables in a Garden
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    Power Play! Campaign

    A complete set of Power Play! Campaign data tables (PDF)Opens in a new browser window

  • Table PP! 1: Source of Food Consumed During Weekday Meals and Snacks
  • Table PP! 2: Who Most Often Makes Children's Meals and Snacks
  • Table PP! 3: Proportion of Children Who Reported Eating 1 or More Servings of Fruits and Vegetables by Meal Times and for Snacks
  • Table PP! 4: Proportion of Children Who Reported Eating Fruits and Vegetables at Meal and Snack Times by Who Prepares the Meal or Snack
  • Table PP! 5: Percentage of California Children Reporting Awareness of the Campaign's Television Spots
  • Table PP! 5a: Percentage of California Children Reporting Awareness of the Campaign Other Than Television Spots
  • Table PP! 5b: Percentage of California Children Reporting Awareness of the Campaign
  • Table PP! 6: California Children Reporting Awareness of the Campaign's Television Spots Associated with Fruit and Vegetable Intake
  • Table PP! 7: Range in Number of Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Consumed by Awareness of the Campaign's Television Spots
  • Table PP! 7a: Range in Number of Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Consumed by Awareness of the Campaign
  • Table PP! 8: Belief About the Number of Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Needed for Good Health by Awareness of the Campaign's Television Spots
  • Table PP! 8a: Belief About the Number of Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Needed for Good Health by Awareness of the Campaign
  • Table PP! 10: California Children Reporting Awareness of the Campaign's Television Spots Associated with Food Preference, Behavioral Capacity, Reinforcement, and Social Norms Table PP!
  • Table PP! 11: California Children Reporting Awareness of the Campaign's Television Spots Associated with Physical and Sedentary Activities
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    Last modified on: 8/13/2010 7:21 AM