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MIHA Successes: Using Data to Improve Maternal and Infant Health

 

MIHA results are used to improve our understanding of emerging health issues and monitor progress in improving the health of mothers and infants across California. These findings inform decisions, influence changes in public health programs and clinical practice, and assist program planners in targeting limited resources.

  Do you use MIHA data in your work? Please tell us how you use MIHA data to improve the health of mothers and infants in California.

 

MIHA provides data to meet reporting mandates

MIHA provides data for multiple reporting mandates across CDPH, including the Health Resources and Services Administration Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant, the primary funding source for State and Local MCAH Programs throughout California. MIHA also has supported the following agencies in meeting their reporting needs: the Office of Family Planning, the California Office of AIDS, and the Alcohol and Drug Program.

 

MIHA data describe women who are eligible for but not enrolled in WIC

Multistate data from MIHA and PRAMS were used to estimate how many women were eligible for but not enrolled in WIC during pregnancy, and to describe their characteristics and risks. Results identify the scope of WIC outreach needed to include more eligible nonparticipants in WIC and whom to target.

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    MIHA provides data to monitor infant feeding and care practices

    MIHA collects data used to monitor progress towards achieving Healthy People 2020 objectives for breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity, and hospital and worksite support for breastfeeding mothers and infants. These data are used to celebrate successes and to identify opportunities to better protect, promote, and support breastfeeding in California. In a recent report, the California Department of Public Health used MIHA data to highlight the contributions of breastfeeding to reducing the burden of childhood overweight and obesity. 

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    MIHA results used in establishing recommendations for weight gain during pregnancy

    In 2006, the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) held a workshop to reexamine the 1990 IOM guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy. MIHA data on pre-pregnancy weight status and patterns of weight gain during pregnancy were provided to the Committee. As a result of this workshop, new IOM recommendations for weight gain during pregnancy by pre-pregnancy weight status (BMI) were released in 2009.

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    MIHA findings used in developing oral health guidelines

    In 2009, the California Dental Association (CDA) Foundation and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, District IX, convened an expert panel to review the relationship between health and oral health status, treatment of oral diseases, and pregnancy outcomes. MIHA results describing who lacks sufficient oral health care and risk factors for not receiving that care in pregnancy were presented. As a result of the expert panel review, the CDA Foundation developed new evidence-based guidelines encouraging delivery of oral health care to women before, during and after pregnancy.

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    MIHA partners with CDC PRAMS to develop new Healthy People 2020 Objectives

    The development of nine Healthy People 2020 Maternal, Infant and Child Health Objectives allows California to compare the well-being of our maternal and infant population to national benchmarks. The new objectives address multiple maternal health factors prior to pregnancy, including preconception health discussions with providers, folic acid use, tobacco use, alcohol use and healthy weight. Additional objectives address postpartum contraceptive use, relapse of smoking postpartum, receipt of a postpartum visit, and placing infants on their backs to sleep.

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    Last modified on: 12/5/2014 9:05 AM